Knox, Usher & McCulloh

11 February 1801 – Narrative of McCulloh partnership

There existed in Baltimore a copartnership under the firm of Knox, Usher & McCulloh, at the dissolution of which Wm Knox & James McCulloh were to collect certain debts and to discharge certain claims against the firm.  The accounts of the Partnership have never been finally settled.

James McCulloh died, Edward Pannell & John Mcculloh became executors to his estate.  A demand was made against Wm Knox at that time, surviving partner of Knox, Usher & McCulloh, by Phineas Bond for a debt due by them to Eddows Patric & Elliot of England.  John McCulloh under an impression that the estate of James McCulloh was indebted to Knox, Usher & McCulloh more than the amount called for by P. Bond, paid Wm Knox $1,200 for the purpose of discharging the same, but without the approbation of his colleague, Ed Pannell & before any specific claim was legally proven by Knox, Usher & McCulloh against the estate of James McCulloh

John McCulloh died & we as Executors to his estate have rendered our account to Ed Pannell the surviving executor to the estate of James McCulloh, who refuses to admit the payment  made Wm Knox by his colleague upon the principle of its being an informal transaction.

Are we liable for the $1,200 & if so what steps must be pursued to obtain the same from Wm Knox who refuses to refund it.  No receipt was given by Wm Knox for the money and the only evidence we possess of its having been paid him, is the entry in John McCulloh’s books where payment stands charged to the estate of James McCulloh.

[Signed by John’s sons] Sam McCulloh and Andrew McCulloh

McCulloh Papers, 1773-1848, Maryland Historical Society, MS 2110, microfilm reel 4, frame 13, 14

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Estate information – 2

21 May 1800 from Philadelphia – Samuel McCulloh to Andrew Mcculloh

Dear Brother,

… I was very apprehensive and I should be obliged to make considerable sacrifices of it the the grumbling tribe of petty dealers in the article an a numerous posse of whom attended…  Their expectations were perhaps never more completely disappointed than on this occasion…

Mr. Frances…(who was I believe aquainted with the quality of the wood) came forward just before the sale was to have commenced and proposed taking the whole of the mahogany…

Last week I sold the coaches for $200 cash.  The sleigh to Mr. Bently for $16.  The horses are still on hand and will part with them if enough to say I  haven’t given them away… being comparably tired of waiting for a reasonable offer.

McCulloh Papers, 1773-1848, Maryland Historical Society, MS 2110, microfilm reel 3, frame 600

Estate information

16 May 1800 from Philadelphia – Samuel McCulloh to Andrew McCulloh

Dear Brother,

I am pleased to find you had an agreeable journey down, but that you left us before the sale of the stock as your Living Vessels  have not yet arrived.  Not an individual has come forward since you left to purchase a single article offered for sale.  This circumstance induces me to think that our expectations concerning them were rather sanguine.  I have offered the mahogany to Mr. Willings & Timones but do not find disposed either to purchase or to allow my permission to send any of it out in their ship to Bengal.

Mr. Bringhurst devise me to write he can build the carriage for $400.  The children are through the smallpox.

McCulloh Papers, 1773-1848, Maryland Historical Society, MS 2110, microfilm reel 3, frame 597

John McCulloh’s will

Background:  John McCulloh (b. 1747) died April 13, 1800.  His will was written 8 October 1797 and proved 23 April 1800.

Be it remembered that I John McCulloh of the district of Southward of the City of Philadelphia Merchant being week in Body but through divine favour of sound mind & disposing memory considering the uncertainty of this life and fitness of settling my worldly concerns preparatory to my final change do make and publish this my lat will & testament in manner following (that is to say)

First I give & bequeath to my beloved wife Anna all my household goods and kitchen furniture of every kind also all the time of servitude of my two indentured girls, also all the time of servitude of my black man James, also a horse & chair and one milch cow, also all that article of plate purchased since our marriage together with the sum of one hundred & fifty pounds current money or money of Pennsylvania.

Item I give & bequest to my eldest son Samuel my silver tankart.  I also give and bequeath my personal trinkets unto my next three eldest sons viz. Andrew John & James.  I also bequeath unto my daughters Anna, Mary & Margaret all the remainder part of my plate in equal proportion part & share alike.  I also give & bequeath to my said daughters Anna & Mary each one mahogany circular bureau table to be purchased for them by my executors.  I also give & bequeath to my daughter Elizabeth the sum of twenty dollars in full of her part & share of my estate

And further it is my will that my real & remaining personal Estate whatsoever and wheresoever shall be sold by my Executors herein after named when ever they shall think proper in their discretion whom I full authorize and empower and the survivors or survivor of them to grant bargain sell and dispose of all my said real Estate either at private or publick sale and to execute acknowlege and deliver in due form of law all such deed or deeds conveyances & assurances as shall be necessary for granting the same in fee simple and inheritance thereof to the purchaser or purchasers thereof his or her or their heirs & I assign for ever and the one equal of third part of the net proceeds arriving by such sale I order and direct shall be vested in the Bank Stock of Pennslvania or in the Publick Stocks of the United States and the clear income arriving out of the same I give & bequeath to my said wife Anna to be by her received from time to time as it shall become due during the continuance of her natural life.  And the remaining two thirds thereof I give & bequeath in equal proportions to my sons Samuel, Andrew, John, James, George, Robert, & Isaac and my daughters Anna, Mary Margaret, Sarah, Isabella and the child of children that my wife may now be pregnant with to be between them equally divided part and share alike.  The shares of those that are minors I also will & order shall be vested in manner aforesaid in the Bank Stock of Pennsylvania or in the publick Stocks of the United States as above directed and the clear income arriving therefrom I will and order shall be applied towards the Education and support of my said minor children which shall be paid into the hands of my wife (for the sole use aforesaid) into whose care I commit my said minor children during the continuance of her widowhood.

And in order to render my intentions effectual & respecting the money to be vested in the Bank Stocks as aforesaid I fully authorize & empower my said Executors or survivors or survivor of them to grant & bargain sell and transfer such stock or stocks so vested as aforesaid at any time when such legacies shall become due and payable to the respective legatees.

And lastly as to the herein before mentioned equal third part of the nett proceeds so vested for the benefit of my wife as aforesaid, I give & bequeath the same (after the decease of my said wife) in equal portion to all my said sons Samuel, Andrew, John, James, George, Robert & Isaac and my said daughters Anna, Mary, Margaret, Sarah, Isabella & the child or children that my wife now may be pregnant with to be between them equally divided part and share alike.

And I do hereby further nominate & appoint my said wife Anna & my sons Samuel & Andrew and a friend William Knox of the City of Philadelphia merchant or the survivors or survivor of them to be the Executors or Executor of this my last will & testament hereby revoking all former wills by me made in witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and seal the twenty eighth day of October in the year of our Lord One thousand seven hundred and ninety seven.

Singed sealed and published & declared by the said [line is in a fold] as his last will & testament in the presence of us.  Signed by John McCulloh

John Fraley, Thomas Parkinson, James Simmons

Philadelphia April 23, 1800.

McCulloh Papers, 1773-1848, Maryland Historical Society, MS 2110, microfilm reel 3, frame 572

John’s Illness – 2

19 April 1800 – Nat Irish to Andrew McCulloh

Your letter of the 10th came to hand yesterday with the unwelcome account of your worthy father’s misfortune…  I hope he is getting better of it and will recover the use of his left side, at least in some measure…

I am sorry I contracted for 20,000 feet of boards and 4000 fee of lath to be delivered in Deer Creek and had given a draught on your father about 9 days ago for $200 for the payment of them.

Nat Irish

McCulloh Papers, 1773-1848, Maryland Historical Society, MS 2110, microfilm reel 3, frame 565

 

Business Dealings – 3

Background:  This is the last letter John McCulloh wrote before his death.

8 March 1800 from Philadelphia – John McCulloh to Andrew McCulloh

My Dear Andrew,

I wrote you some days since & am without any of yours since that time.  Mr. Bringhurst has told me this day that the gig is ready, but Mattis will not take it down for less than twenty dollars on act of something having occurred to Mr. Rogers so that he wishes not to take the coaches.  That his friend bespoke so that it is most likely that unless some unforeseen occurrence, it must be sent by water but in this Mr. Pierce must direct.  I wish you to request Mr. Pierce to take my policy to the Insurance office.  I have it made a Value policy.  I have had the one here made so without any difficutlty.

I leave this on Monday morning for New York.  I expect to return on this day week.   Remember me to all my Balitmore friends.                                             Remain your affectionate father, John McCulloh

 

10 May 1800 from Baltimore – Andrew McCulloh to Samuel McCulloh

… Uncle Pannell wants Mr. Bringhurst to make him a carriage (without harness) and nearly of the same fashion shape and size of that which Mr. Simmons made for Mr. Pierce some time ago.  The body to be made with a sword case to hang on steel springs and painted a handsome green, the carriage to be made with a pearch so as to go either with one or two horses.

McCulloh Papers, 1773-1848, Maryland Historical Society, MS 2110, microfilm reel 3, frame 522, 597