Conclusion

This concludes the letters transcribed from the McCulloh family.

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George McCulloh

15 February 1812 – Letter from Isabella McCulloh

George had a fine voyage of 307 days.

3 Dec 1815 –

George reported lost in a storm.  He was put on a boat because he wasn’t feeling well.

An 1820 letter says George is still alive.

McCulloh Papers, 1773-1848, Maryland Historical Society, MS 2110, microfilm reel 5, frame 120, 173

 

James W. McCulloh

23 December 1809 from Philadelphia – James W. McCulloh to Samuel McCulloh

Dear Brother,

Your last favor came duly to hand which was welcomed by a joy of receiving more of your kind advice for certainly you cannot suppose I consider it as ill natured remarks. No Sir.  I assure you it is rec’d by me as marks of your kindness & good wishes for my advancement in life.  it was in but one particular that I thought you rather hard upon me which was that of calling my Brothers & Sisters to my assistance.  Because Mama & Brother Sammy generally reads your letters to me, any advice that you may think proper to bestow on me for the future shall be attended to to the utmost of my ability.  I thank you for your kind congratulations on the profession & situation which I have made choice of for my future business.  Mr. Knox is certainly as capable of affording me knowledge of business in general as anyone else as far as I am able to judge. It gives me pleasure to serve him.  [unreadable] paying strict attention to his admonitions I will reap great advantage.  It is true that to attention must be added the strides of integrity & honor for a man without these stands very low in the rank of this life.  I shall strive to adhere to them by calling to my remembrance, the many good instructions of a departed parent whose name shall ever be held dear to me, while I have the honor of hearing it for it is certainly as you observe an honor to me to hear his name who was affectionate & worthy Father.  Indulgent friend, may I ever be guided by his instructions, follow the paths which he has followed & laid open unto us.  For I trust his ways were pleasant & his end everlasting peace.  Happy indeed would it be for us at the close of our lives to receive his [Christ’s] merited award which I hope is laid up for all those who believe & trust in him who was meek & lowly of heart.

A thousand thanks my dear brother for the good wishes you express’d for my health & happiness.  I can only return that fortune may crown you with success in business is my sincere wish.

I suppose that good news of Mr. Thomas Jefferson’s being elected as president operates very well on you.  I think the Carolinians managed the business exceedingly well and it must be mortifying to Mr. Adams to be taken so sudden from chief Magistrate of the nation to subject.  I believe the people in general would now have been much displeased if Mr. Adams had been elected so that they put Mr. Jefferson in as vice pres’t in expectations that Mr. Adams would be too old to serve again & would resign.  In that time the republican party would be but a poor chance of electing their favorite Mr. Pinchry.

With due respect and affection I remain yours truly J. W. McCulloh

Ps.  Had there an opportunity offered by private hand, I would have sent it by that person.  But I now hand you this by post thinking it full time to return you an answer.

McCulloh Papers, 1773-1848, Maryland Historical Society, MS 2110, microfilm reel 5, frame 72

Doctor Bill

20 October 1803

The estate of the late Mr. John McCulloh to C. Wister, Dr.

For attendance to his son in yellow fever in consultation – July 1799 – $15

For attendance to Mr. McCulloh – April 1800 – $30

For attendance to the family principally to Isaac – 1801 – $25

For attendance to Isaac – 1802 [amount blocked out]

For attendance to Isaac & black boy – $10

Total $90

McCulloh Papers, 1773-1848, Maryland Historical Society, MS 2110, microfilm reel 4, frame 246

James W. McCulloh

Background:  Exactly a year from the day of his father’s death, James W. McCulloh wrote this letter to his brother.  He would have been 12 years old at the time.

13 April 1801 from Philadelphia – James W. McCulloh to Samuel McCulloh

Dear Brother,

Brother Samuel, in a letter from you some time ago, in which you mentioned there was a vacancy in one of Mr. Pierce’s dry goods stores.  That you thought it would be a more suitable situation for me than where I now am. That Mr. Pierce was willing for me to fill that vacancy.  Sammy mentioned it to Mr. Knox.  He said he had no objections to it.  I have asked Mr. Knox when it would suit him to let me go down.  Having all my things ready, he says he would like me to stay until the schooner Roun returned from Cape Francais, which he thinks will be in a week or ten days and it may be two or three weeks most likely before I could leave him.  But he says if it is necessary for me to go down this week he has no objections to it.  Therefore I would thank you to let me know by return post when it is necessary for me to be there.  I shall be guided by your reply.

Remain yours affectionately, J. W. McCulloh

NB – Sammy and Mr. Pierce’s letter return remittances in due time.  It is by request of Sammy that I write you.

McCulloh Papers, 1773-1848, Maryland Historical Society, MS 2110, microfilm reel 4, frame 38, 39

Estate information – 2

21 May 1800 from Philadelphia – Samuel McCulloh to Andrew Mcculloh

Dear Brother,

… I was very apprehensive and I should be obliged to make considerable sacrifices of it the the grumbling tribe of petty dealers in the article an a numerous posse of whom attended…  Their expectations were perhaps never more completely disappointed than on this occasion…

Mr. Frances…(who was I believe aquainted with the quality of the wood) came forward just before the sale was to have commenced and proposed taking the whole of the mahogany…

Last week I sold the coaches for $200 cash.  The sleigh to Mr. Bently for $16.  The horses are still on hand and will part with them if enough to say I  haven’t given them away… being comparably tired of waiting for a reasonable offer.

McCulloh Papers, 1773-1848, Maryland Historical Society, MS 2110, microfilm reel 3, frame 600

John McCulloh’s will

Background:  John McCulloh (b. 1747) died April 13, 1800.  His will was written 8 October 1797 and proved 23 April 1800.

Be it remembered that I John McCulloh of the district of Southward of the City of Philadelphia Merchant being week in Body but through divine favour of sound mind & disposing memory considering the uncertainty of this life and fitness of settling my worldly concerns preparatory to my final change do make and publish this my lat will & testament in manner following (that is to say)

First I give & bequeath to my beloved wife Anna all my household goods and kitchen furniture of every kind also all the time of servitude of my two indentured girls, also all the time of servitude of my black man James, also a horse & chair and one milch cow, also all that article of plate purchased since our marriage together with the sum of one hundred & fifty pounds current money or money of Pennsylvania.

Item I give & bequest to my eldest son Samuel my silver tankart.  I also give and bequeath my personal trinkets unto my next three eldest sons viz. Andrew John & James.  I also bequeath unto my daughters Anna, Mary & Margaret all the remainder part of my plate in equal proportion part & share alike.  I also give & bequeath to my said daughters Anna & Mary each one mahogany circular bureau table to be purchased for them by my executors.  I also give & bequeath to my daughter Elizabeth the sum of twenty dollars in full of her part & share of my estate

And further it is my will that my real & remaining personal Estate whatsoever and wheresoever shall be sold by my Executors herein after named when ever they shall think proper in their discretion whom I full authorize and empower and the survivors or survivor of them to grant bargain sell and dispose of all my said real Estate either at private or publick sale and to execute acknowlege and deliver in due form of law all such deed or deeds conveyances & assurances as shall be necessary for granting the same in fee simple and inheritance thereof to the purchaser or purchasers thereof his or her or their heirs & I assign for ever and the one equal of third part of the net proceeds arriving by such sale I order and direct shall be vested in the Bank Stock of Pennslvania or in the Publick Stocks of the United States and the clear income arriving out of the same I give & bequeath to my said wife Anna to be by her received from time to time as it shall become due during the continuance of her natural life.  And the remaining two thirds thereof I give & bequeath in equal proportions to my sons Samuel, Andrew, John, James, George, Robert, & Isaac and my daughters Anna, Mary Margaret, Sarah, Isabella and the child of children that my wife may now be pregnant with to be between them equally divided part and share alike.  The shares of those that are minors I also will & order shall be vested in manner aforesaid in the Bank Stock of Pennsylvania or in the publick Stocks of the United States as above directed and the clear income arriving therefrom I will and order shall be applied towards the Education and support of my said minor children which shall be paid into the hands of my wife (for the sole use aforesaid) into whose care I commit my said minor children during the continuance of her widowhood.

And in order to render my intentions effectual & respecting the money to be vested in the Bank Stocks as aforesaid I fully authorize & empower my said Executors or survivors or survivor of them to grant & bargain sell and transfer such stock or stocks so vested as aforesaid at any time when such legacies shall become due and payable to the respective legatees.

And lastly as to the herein before mentioned equal third part of the nett proceeds so vested for the benefit of my wife as aforesaid, I give & bequeath the same (after the decease of my said wife) in equal portion to all my said sons Samuel, Andrew, John, James, George, Robert & Isaac and my said daughters Anna, Mary, Margaret, Sarah, Isabella & the child or children that my wife now may be pregnant with to be between them equally divided part and share alike.

And I do hereby further nominate & appoint my said wife Anna & my sons Samuel & Andrew and a friend William Knox of the City of Philadelphia merchant or the survivors or survivor of them to be the Executors or Executor of this my last will & testament hereby revoking all former wills by me made in witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and seal the twenty eighth day of October in the year of our Lord One thousand seven hundred and ninety seven.

Singed sealed and published & declared by the said [line is in a fold] as his last will & testament in the presence of us.  Signed by John McCulloh

John Fraley, Thomas Parkinson, James Simmons

Philadelphia April 23, 1800.

McCulloh Papers, 1773-1848, Maryland Historical Society, MS 2110, microfilm reel 3, frame 572