Doctor Bill

20 October 1803

The estate of the late Mr. John McCulloh to C. Wister, Dr.

For attendance to his son in yellow fever in consultation – July 1799 – $15

For attendance to Mr. McCulloh – April 1800 – $30

For attendance to the family principally to Isaac – 1801 – $25

For attendance to Isaac – 1802 [amount blocked out]

For attendance to Isaac & black boy – $10

Total $90

McCulloh Papers, 1773-1848, Maryland Historical Society, MS 2110, microfilm reel 4, frame 246

Family Happenings – 6

27 August 1801 from Philadelphia – Anna McCulloh to Andrew McCulloh

Dear Andrew,

I received yours of August 24th enclosing a note of $531.81.  I have purchased seven shares of the 8 per Cts with the money you sent me and some I had in the house belonging to the estate.  I thought it best to have it invested in some way to bring in interest.  My money being most that Sammy left me for the support of the family I was obligated to go to [the] bank for the interest due on our certificates for the last quarter.

Mr. G. Taylor was polite enough to go with me as it was a new thing to me.  I was glad of his company.  The interest was $250.  The 1st of October I can take up the interest of seven shares more but if I do without it I will wait until Sammy returns which will be in November I expect.

Isaac is better than when I wrote you last, the ___es discharging much freer than they did at that time.  The Dr. has never given me his opinion about him but his back seems to project out and I think if it continues growing it will form a lump.

12 October 1801 from Philadelphia – Anna McCulloh to Andrew McCulloh

Have a machine for curved spine.

McCulloh Papers, 1773-1848, Maryland Historical Society, MS 2110, microfilm reel 4, frame 51, 56

 

Family Happenings – 4

13 June 1801 from Philadelphia – Anna McCulloh to Andrew McCulloh

…We all enjoy good health except Isaac who has got his old complaint in his back.  You recollect about eighteen months or so he complained much of a pain in his back.  Even then thought lightly of it but it has returned with so much violence that I was alarmed & sent for Dr. Wister.  He has blistered him on the part affected & I hope through this he will get better off.

I received a letter S[amuel] dated Germantown June 4th.  He was well but very much fatigued.  It was to be hoped that the great speed he thinks to make will repay him all his trouble which in my opinion will not be a little.  He is going to Kentucky.  He tells me in his letter if you wish to write him direct to Levi Todd, Esq, Lexington, Kentucky.

Miss Molly is much after the old fashion.  Your friends in Germantown are well.  Thomas is about taking himself a wife  Miss Fauley it seems is a Lady.  Do not be so much out of humor with yourself.  Perhaps you [will] meet with some kind lass who will pity your case.  [Fold in paper, unreadable] depend it is one of the happiest times in this world.  Give out love to John.  Tell him the children talk a great deal about him & William has grown a fine boy.  That with happiness attend you both in sincerity of

Your affectionate mother, Anna McCulloh

 

19 June 1801 from Philadelphia – Anna McCulloh to Samuel McCulloh

Thomas [Bringhurst] is to be married this evening to Mary Base [Fraley] at Germantown.

McCulloh Papers, 1773-1848, Maryland Historical Society, MS 2110, microfilm reel 4, frame 42, 44